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Thursday May 25, 2017 at 10:47am Age: 176 days
Category: Intermediate, District

MVIS SPRING ART SHOW: EQUAL PARTS OF WORK AND PLEASURE


Fantastic wriggly creatures, gleaming castles, and a feast of mouthwatering foods and treats greeted chorus-concert goers as they gathered outside the school auditorium on May 23.

This hypnotic display was the creation of fourth and fifth grade students in Stefani Caporlingua’s art classes, and part of the annual spring art show.

Dedicated to sculpture and architecture, with a focus on metal and clay, the art work speaks loudly of the sheer pleasure students derived from the creative process. And that’s not all.

Fifth grade art projects…

The small, twisted figures, inspired by the works of Alberto Giacometti, were built around a skeleton—a.k.a., armature—of wire and aluminum. Constructing and stabilizing the figures gave fifth graders new insights into the proportions and structure of the human body.

The enticing and popular food sculptures, fashioned after the soft sculptures of Claes Oldenburg, required special attention to detail, especially in regard to color. Each sculpture was carefully molded, then painted numerous times to replicate the natural colors of the students' food of choice. “I was astounded by the results, and the excitement the students displayed while working was positively contagious,” Mrs. Caporlingua said. 

Fourth grade art projects...

Following a lecture and discussion on the architecture and function of castles, students were off to dream up their own vibrant and majestic fortresses. They began with a design, then embossed it into metal sheets. 

The joy of teaching art…

“My favorite part about teaching art is the freedom I can provide my students,” Mrs. Caporlingua said. “I like to begin a lesson with a generic, sometimes boring example, and then challenge my students to create something better. I keep an open mind and encourage wacky ideas. ‘A snowboarding chicken?’ Why not? I am constantly floored by the extraordinary work my students produce, and it's a joy to watch them create!”